Saxon

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Saxon’s 1979 debut already hinted that a rough diamond was about to emerge. Their second recording, Wheels Of Steel, tuned into a mega seller, as Saxon went on to tour all over the world. The successor, Strong Arm Of The Law, and especially their double platinum release Denim And Leather (1981) reinforced Saxon’s reputation. Tours of America, an appearance at the Monsters Of Rock festival in Castle Donington, and the live album The Eagle Has Landed (1982) (according to Melody Maker “one of the best live recordings of the decade”) followed. Power And Glory (1983) was another classic that caused a stir, particularly in the States. Crusader (1984), oriented towards the US radio charts, was greeted by the odd critical voice that complained about Saxon’s supposed mainstream ambitions. Innocence Is No Excuse in particular met with mixed reactions. “Our Def Leppard album,” was Biff’s retrospective comment on this unusually melodic recording. Rock The Nation and Destiny also faced fair to middling reviews. “Record company and management tried to gear us towards the American market,” Biff explains the Saxon sound of those days.

 

Following a two-year break, the band returned in 1990 with a new record contract and their impressive comeback, Solid Ball Of Rock. The two subsequent releases, Forever Free and Dogs Of War, and the ensuing tour kept the band on their toes, while Saxon succeeded in consolidating their impressive live reputation. Their 1996 live album, The Eagle Has Landed II, followed by Unleash The Beast and Metalhead, proved that the band were ready to face the new millennium, as they went on to release Killing Ground, their best-of release, Heavy Metal Thunder, and their first DVD, The Saxon Chronicles. Now they’re proud to present Lionheart, the latest release by a band with the heart of a lion. Following their 2004 release, Lionheart, the band embarked on one of the longest and most successful tours of their career, a fact that was also reflected by their release, The Inner Sanctum (2007) and extends well into the spheres of their latest offering, Into The Labyrinth.